Undiscovered Paris: A Self-Guided Tour of Paris’ Hidden Gems

We truly believe that Paris is best explored by wandering. Or as the French call it, flâner. And while we could spent a lifetime strolling around Paris, we thought we would save you some time and compiled a list of the top hidden spots in Paris!

Le Palais Royal

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Despite its proximity to the Louvre, this spot gets passed up by many tourists. This garden oasis is a reprieve from the bustle just outside its walls in the heart of Paris. And its black and white columns make for a fun Instagram shot! People watch in the gardens or from atop a column and soak in some sunshine.

Courtyard of the National Archives

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While the National Archives are a tourist destination, the gardens are worth exploring in themselves. For the quietest time, visit on a Tuesday when the archives are closed, but the grounds are still open. Walk through the main gates and to the right for more gardens and impressive building exterior views.

Passages of Paris

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We came across several of these covered arcades, which are easy to walk right by without noticing. These arcades often have shops and restaurants housed on the interior. The Galerie Vero-Dodat is one of 25 remaining passageways built in the 19th century. The passage’s black and white diamond-shaped marble paving give it a beautiful effect, and the parts of the ceiling that are not glass are decorated with beautiful engravings. We found this arcade to be especially enchanting in the evening. And the Christian Louboutin store housed here is perfect for window shopping. After stopping by Galerie Vero-Dodat, catch happy hour in one of the small bars nearby.

Les Arènes de Lutèce

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Did you know that Paris has a Roman Colosseum of its very own? Long forgotten, this remnant from the Gallo-Roman era resurfaced in the 1800s during construction in the area. Situated in the Latin Quarter, this amphitheater could once seat 15,000 spectators for gladiator fights. The Arènes de Lutèce is a fun stop for history buffs, and a walk around the perimeter past beautiful gardens is enjoyable for all.

Neighborhood courtyard parks

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Paris has some incredible parks tucked into its neighborhoods that only locals know about. Square Georges Cain is a little park situated in the trendy Marais district, and provides an oasis of greenery to people who have been lucky enough to stumble upon it. This park is also popular among neighborhood regulars who would like to keep it a secret. Square Georges Cain has two pieces of artwork: ‘L’Aurore’, a bronze statue of a nude woman in the middle of a rose bed by the 17th-century sculptor Laurent Magnier, and ‘Le Rossignol Electrique’ by Eric Samakh (1990), a small electronic bird that starts singing whenever the wind blows.

 

Église St. Gervais & Rue des Barres

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Rue des Barres is a stone’s throw from Île de la Cité but will transport you to a quaint village setting. Chairs line the cobblestone street in the warmer months and are ideal for people watching. Tucked into this street is Église St. Gervais. This church is overshadowed by its more famous neighbor, Notre Dame de Paris, but is equally beautiful. The church was built between 1494 and 1657 and its facade was the first example of French baroque style in Paris.

 

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Everything You Need to Know: Planning a Trip to Paris

Must read when planning a trip to Paris!

Packing

In summary, think minimalism. Stick to one small bag and a personal carry on (like a backpack or purse) if at all possible. You will be much happier to not be lugging giant suitcases up and down the metro stairs (escalators are rare). Classic clothes in dark colors with a scarf are standard for Parisians, plus a comfortable yet stylish pair of walking shoes. Bring just the essential electronics (including converter) and travel sized toiletries, or buy toiletries upon your arrival.

Money

We highly recommend exchanging money to Euros before traveling to avoid getting ripped off at airport exchange booths. Bringing sufficient cash to have on hand is useful since many places in Paris may not accept card or have a minimum. However, we have noticed that more establishments accept major credit cards now. If you end up needing to withdraw cash abroad, there are many ATMs around the city and most storeowners will know where the closest ones are. Check with your bank to see if any withdrawal fees apply. 

IMPORTANT: Call your bank before traveling to inform them of your travel dates. This will prevent your bank from freezing your card due to potential fraudulent activity.

Accommodations

The earlier you book, the better the rates and availability. Paris accommodations fill up quickly, and prices fluctuate throughout the year, being the highest at peak summertime. Le Marais, Saint-Germain-des-Prés, and Latin Quarter are centrally located, making it easy to visit most tourist destinations. If you’re okay with a longer commute, Place de la République, Oberkampf, and Montmartre all offer travelers affordable and authentic Parisian housing options in buzzing areas. Paris is full of unique boutique hotels like Hôtel Providence and Hôtel la Belle Juliette. We had great experiences with our two Airbnb’s, which were more affordable than most centrally located hotels we looked at during our travel dates. 

Transportation

Metro is by far the best and most affordable way to get around. The metro’s expansive network will get you to practically anywhere you need to go. If you are in Paris for a full week, purchasing a Navigo card is well worth it. The Navigo pass permits transportation on the metro, RER, and bus systems and at a much better rate than the individual paper passes sold. Weekly pass covers travel Monday (start date) through Sunday (end date), no matter which day you happen to purchase the pass. So if you buy a pass on Wednesday, your “weekly pass” will still end on Sunday. Other Navigo pass options are also available for longer stays. 

IMPORTANT: it is not very clear and the SNCF staff will likely fail to mention that you MUST write your name and attach a photo to your Navigo card ASAP before using. Failure to do so will result in a fine of about 35 euros per person if stopped by police in the metro. You can take a passport style photo in booths set up in train stations where Navigo cards are available for purchase. Or save yourself some hassle and money and print out photos prior to your trip. 

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Best Indoor Activities to Do in Washington, D.C.

Don’t let a bit of rain ruin your fun in Washington, D.C.! These indoor, rainy day activities are the perfect way to spend a weekend in the Capital City.

 

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Museum exhibits

Some of our favorite Smithsonian museums include the Air and Space and American History Museums. If you have seen it all, or just want a break from the ever-popular Smithsonians, explore the Phillips Collection in DuPont. Opened in 1921, the Phillips Collection is the America’s first museum of modern art located in a converted Georgian Revival style home. Luncheon of the Boating Party by Renoir (pictured here) is among the museum’s personal collection.

 

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U.S. Botanic Garden

Rain or shine, winter or summer, the U.S. Botanic Garden is sure to be green and warm any time of year. This living plant museum was established by the U.S. Congress in 1820 and is one of the oldest botanic gardens in North America. Wander among blooming orchids, cacti of all shapes and sizes, dramatic air plants, and gigantic trees.

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Bookshop browsing

There is nothing better than snuggling up with a good book while the rain pours outside. Browse in these unique and quintessentially D.C. spots: Capitol Hill Books, Second Story Books, and Kramerbooks.

 

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Library of Congress

Speaking of books… Did you know there are more than 162 million items stored here, making the Library of Congress the largest library collection in the world? Notable exhibits include a re-created version of Jefferson’s library, the first document printed with the name “America” (also known as America’s “birth certificate”), and Lincoln’s pocket items at the time of his assassination.

 

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Coffee shops with a unique atmosphere

Heads up that many D.C. coffee shops have selective hours on Sundays. Our favorites are Baked & Wired in Georgetown (both the cupcakes and coffee are excellent), Emissary in DuPont (great brunch and happy hour every day 4-7pm too), and Sidamo Coffee & Tea on H Street (they roast their beans on-site and perform Ethiopian coffee ceremonies on weekends).

How to Book Cheap Flights Anywhere

Getting to a travel destination can be the most expensive part of planning a trip. But it doesn’t have to be. Here are some key tips that will save you time, frustration, and most importantly money!

 

1. Use flight search engines

Search engines aggregate flights to find the best deals for you. Many also offer price alerts when airfares drop to whatever destinations you’ve been eyeing. Our 5 favorite search engines are:

Scott’s Cheap Flights is a useful subscription service we frequently use. Subscribers receive cheap flight alerts going all over the world departing from the region(s) you choose. 

2. Keep searches private

Thanks to the cookies in your browser, flight prices increase when a particular destination is repeatedly searched. Search for flights incognito in private browsing mode to view the lowest prices.

3. Be flexible with dates

Avoid flying on weekends (Fridays through Sundays), which are typically the most days to travel. Offset costs by leaving on a Thursday and returning the following week if possible.

Also avoid busy travel times like holidays and school breaks, since flights will be more expensive during these high-demand periods. Additionally, planning a trip during your destination’s low season practically guarantees lower prices on flights AND accommodations, not to mention fewer crowds.

4. A longer flight itinerary means savings

If extremely price sensitive, look for flights with long connections or overnights. While it may be less convenient to add travel hours or even overnight in an airport, doing so could mean big savings on flights and more money to spend during your vacation.

Not recommended for those with limited vacation time.

5. Book as soon as possible

Flights typically become more expensive the closer you book to your travel dates. Your biggest savings come from booking far in advance when possible.

International flights are less expensive at least two months before travel dates, while domestic flights can range from a few months to weeks in advance. The beginning of the week is generally the best time to book flights, while Fridays are the most expensive.

 

We want to hear from YOU! Where are you planning your next trip? Comment below and subscribe so we can keep in touch.

 

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The West Texas Bucket List

Your guide to the top things to do and see in West Texas.

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Davis Mountains – Far west Texas isn’t just open desert like the movies would have you believe. Explore Davis Mountains State Park’s miles of trails, camping, and informational programming… More

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McDonald Observatory – The stars at night are extra big and bright at this West Texas mountaintop observatory. Hundreds of miles from bright city lights, the McDonald Observatory offers unbeatable star gazing… More

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The Gage Hotel – This historic desert oasis in Marathon, TX was voted among the top Texas hotels by Condé Nast. Talk about old country charm!… More

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Marfa – In this tiny West Texas town, there’s a Gram-worthy photo around practically every corner that is sure to elicit jealousy from friends… More

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Alpine – Explore the town of Alpine, located between Marfa and Marathon. Catch a semi-pro Cowboys baseball game at historic Kokernot Field… More

Let us know what you think in the comments below!

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Star Gazing at McDonald Observatory

The stars at night are extra big and bright at this West Texas mountaintop observatory. Hundreds of miles from bright city lights, the McDonald Observatory offers stargazers unbeatable views. Plan your visit around catching a Star Party where you’ll have access to outdoor telescopes at the observatory’s park and an interactive overview of the night sky. Star Parties are offered on Tuesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays. Dress warmly with layers because nighttime temps dip, even in the summer. Daytime activities are also offered if you’re not a night owl.

Weather conditions can quickly change near the observatory, so if the skies are overcast in the morning, things may clear up by evening. If it happens to be cloudy during your visit, you’ll be offered alternative programming indoors, or you may be able to reschedule.

Stay the night at accommodations close to the observatory. Options include Indian Lodge, or for the more adventurous, pitch a tent at Davis Mountains State Park.

Nearby things to do: 

Davis Mountains

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The Gage Hotel

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Marfa

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Alpine

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Alpine, Texas: “The Last Frontier”

Explore the town of Alpine, located between Marfa and Marathon. Get a sense of place at Stylle Read’s wall mural Big Brewster outside of the Kiowa Gallery. This mural portrays notable town figures including visionaries such as Everett Townsend who spearheaded the creation of Big Bend National Park, successful rancher Herbert Kokernot who established the Alpine Cowboys baseball club in 1946, and local celebs such as Dan Blocker who became better known as Hoss Cartwright on the“Bonanza” TV series also appear in the mural. Keep an eye out for more murals scattered throughout Alpine.

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Catch a semi-pro Alpine Cowboys baseball game at historic Kokernot Field during the season that runs from May through August. With inexpensive tickets, a boisterous local crowd, the Davis Mountains as the field’s backdrop and brews from nearby Big Bend Brewing Co., you’re guaranteed to have a good time. Fun fact: the 06 symbol found throughout the park tie in to the Kokernot family’s cattle branding from back in the day. Not in town during baseball season? You can still visit the field’s exterior intricate ironwork.

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The Museum of the Big Bend at Sul Ross University is worth a visit. The Big Bend Legacy exhibit gives visitors deep insight into the natural and human histories of the region. Other temporary rotating exhibits include Terry Cockerham’s “Big Bend and the Terlingua Project” and “Early Education and the Annual Summer Normal in Alpine.” Admission to all exhibits is free!

Nearby things to do:

McDonald Observatory

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The Gage Hotel

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Marfa

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Davis Mountains

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The Gage Hotel in West Texas

The Gage Hotel is located in the charming town of Marathon that still has a frontier feel to this day. On the U.S. National Registry of Historic Places, the Gage Hotel was built in 1926 by successful rancher Alfred Gage and later converted into a hotel.

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Guests can stay in the historic Western style hotel, pueblo style adobe brick rooms in Los Portales, or have complete privacy in casitas. Enjoy the hotel pool, gym, White Buffalo bar, and V6 health conscious foods for your coffee and smoothie needs.

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Watch people and trains passing by from the ivy covered porch in a wooden rocking chair, mediate in a courtyard, or cool off in the pool with a frozen drink from the White Buffalo bar. With so much old country charm, its no surprise that this historic desert oasis was voted among the top Texas hotels by Condé Nast Traveler.

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Located a short distance across the train tracks is the manicured Gage Gardens, covering a lush 27 acres. We recommend visiting early in the morning to enjoy cooler temps and beautiful lighting.

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Learn more about the Gage Hotel and make reservations.

Things to do nearby:

Davis Mountains

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McDonald Observatory

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Marfa

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Alpine

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The Davis Mountains in West Texas

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Far west Texas isn’t just open desert like Hollywood movies would have you believe. The Davis Mountains rise up above the open plain and exposing interesting rock formations along the canyon walls. Explore Davis Mountains State Park‘s miles of trails, camping, and informational Ranger programming. Trails range from easy stroll to challenging, offering something for every level of hiker. Remember to bring plenty of water on hikes, and keep in mind that burn bans may be in effect during your visit, so plan accordingly. For those looking for further hiking and camping, the Davis Mountains also serve as a gateway to nearby Big Bend State Park.

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Checking information boards near the entrance of any park or campsite will give valuable information, such as check-in/out procedures, information on burn bans if applicable, maps of the area, and more.

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We enjoyed a ranger programming event on our visit with a costumed Civilian Conservation Corps soldier. He discussed events of the particular time period and demonstrated what soldiers would have carried with them to set up camp. Check upcoming Ranger events before you go.

The McDonald Observatory is a short 15-20 minute drive away from Davis Mountains State Park. Plan to work this into your West Texas travels–it’s an incredible experience!

Other nearby things to do:

McDonald Observatory

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The Gage Hotel

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Marfa

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Alpine

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Check out more hiking inspo from our trip to Jackson Hole.

Top Photo Ops in Marfa, Texas

A tiny blip on the radar, Marfa is a far West Texas town turned cultural art mecca. Getting there won’t be easy though — the nearest airports are located in El Paso and Midland and are both about 3 hours away — but we promise the extra effort will be worth it! In this tiny West Texas town, there’s a Gram-worthy photo around practically every corner that is sure to elicit jealousy from friends. Here are our top photo op picks and things to do in Marfa.

The Paisano Hotel

The historic Paisano Hotel has old world charm, so its no wonder the film stars of the movie epic Giant, including Elizabeth Taylor and James Dean chose to stay here when filming nearby. The hotel courtyard offers a tranquil relaxation spot, and the bubbling fountain makes you almost forget you’re in the west Texas desert. Step inside the lobby to view photography on exhibit from the making of the film epic Giant. Bonus: Grab a super cheap and delicious breakfast burrito served up at the hotel restaurant in the am for just $5.

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Presidio County Courthouse

The charming pink building is nestled at the end of Marfa’s main street and can be seen from almost any spot in town. The view from the top of the courthouse tower is phenomenal, especially if you get up early to catch it at sunrise.

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Prada Marfa

The surreal Prada Marfa shop is a short 30 minute drive from Marfa through ranch land and desert. You’ve probably seen celebs like Rihanna pose in front of this false storefront, so why not snap a picture in front of it yourself? Plan to drive out in the evening to catch sunset for great lighting.

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El Cosmico campground

Just minutes from the heart of Marfa, El Cosmico campground offers visitors an eccentric glamping paradise. Stay overnight in colorful trailer homes, teepees or yurts. Communal spaces with hammocks and an outdoor kitchen give guests a chance to meet fellow travelers and exchange stories.

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Chinati Foundation

Renowned artist Donald Judd created larger than life installations in and around Marfa. The Chinati Foundation building in town exudes desert vibes with its dusty colored exterior. This converted building was formerly the Marfa Wool and Mohair Building in the center of town located just off the railroad tracks. Today, the building houses the installation of John Chamberlain’s 22 sculptures in painted and chromium-plated steel. Take a short trip out of town to visit more contemporary art installations that are part of the Chinati Foundation.

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Pure Joy Marfa tower

Located a few blocks off of the main street, this silo will remind you to find happiness in the little things.

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How to Spend 3 Days in New Orleans

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New Orleans: where history and culture come together to create a vibrant, dynamic city. Follow your NOLA, and let adventure find you! We promise fun discoveries are waiting around practically every corner.

Day 1

French Quarter & Bourbon Street

Roam the French Quarter by day, and you’ll be rewarded with exciting sights. Talented street musicians serenade passersby, and historic European-styled buildings lining the avenues will transport you to a faraway time. History is available for purchase at dozens of antique shops. Don’t forget to make a pit stop to fuel up on beignets at the charming Cafe Beignet or world-famous Café du Monde (open 24 hours, so you can stop in no matter when the craving hits). Near the waterfront, St. Louis Cathedral dominates the view of Jackson Square by day, and fortune tellers line the Square by night.

Those looking for a raucous night will enjoy bar hopping along the infamous Bourbon Street. Bars line the street and offer to-go drinks in plastic cups, which is totally fine in NOLA since open container is legal here. Go just one or two streets over on Royal St or Chartres St, and you’ll find yourself in a more tranquil, laid back atmosphere with jazz bars and unique dining options away from the more gaudy tourist traps.

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Bourbon Street by day

 

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Exploring  the French Quarter

Day 2

Garden District

Elegance is the definition of NOLA’s Garden District. Wander Charles Ave by foot, bike, or trolly past antebellum mansions and pristine gardens that line the boulevard. Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 is a popular attraction of the area with raised tombs in family crypts dating back to 1833. Saint Charles Ave and Magazine Street run parallel to each other on the outer edges of the Garden District and offer good dining and shopping options. Also, if you’re fortunate to visit New Orleans during Mardi Gras, this is a great, low-key area to catch city-wide and local parades! Plus residents go all out and dress up their homes in full theme: yellow, green, and purple.

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Strolling Saint Charles Ave

 

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Historic homes in the Garden District

Day 3

Uptown, Carrollton & Magazine Street

Beautiful 19th century homes and small scale shops and cafes reinforce small town vibes in Uptown and Carrollton. The neighborhood has many stylish and eclectic stores and countless dining options. We got a good caffeine buzz after stopping in a few quaint coffee shops including Rue de la Course, which is set in a historic bank building.

Audubon Park

Audubon has a small city park meets Central Park feel. The paved trail loops around the central golf course for 1.8 miles beneath a shady canopy of moss-covered live oaks. Audubon Park is perfect spot to picnic and soak up some sun.

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Aubudon Park

Foodie Must Eats

Sylvain – Set in a renovated carriage house originally built in 1776, Sylvain offers fresh American fare. Sylvain is an ode to impeccable Southern cooking at its finest. We loved the gulf shrimp crudo and champagne & fries pairing. Try to hit the restaurant at an off hour since they seat on a first come, first served basis. If you do have to wait, Sylvain’s excellent bar makes the time pass quickly.

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Sylvain (sylvainnola.com)

Cavan – Starving and tired after a long day of exploring, we were thrilled to discover a mansion from 1880s converted into a dining room on the entry level and a bar on the second floor. Walking into the beautifully deteriorating mansion was like jumping back in time. We closed the place down sipping on cocktails after dinner upstairs and listening to the bartenders’ ghost stories. P.S. Do NOT skip dessert here–its 100% worth those extra calories!

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Cavan dining room (cavannola.com)

Maple Street Patisserie – We found this pastry shop by chance wandering around Uptown. Apparently it was voted Best Bakery in New Orleans, and we’re not second guessing. Their king cake was amazing, not to mention creamy eclairs, delectable petit fours, and a guava turnover that sent our taste buds for a spin.

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Maple Street Patisserie’s guava turnover

Looking for weekend getaway inspiration? Check out our guide to doing New York City in 48 hours.

Are you a self-proclaimed foodie? We’ve got you covered with all the best spots in Jackson Hole.

Vacation Vagabonds Guide: NYC in 48 Hours

New York City – A dazzling skyline, compact boroughs, streets packed with interesting shops, and unique people. In all its multifaceted angles, there are a thousand ways to “do” a trip to NYC. We decided to tackle the City in 48 hours and experience as much of it as we could in one short weekend. And boy did we pack in a lot! We took an urban wandering approach to experiencing NYC in the fall and let the structure of the city guide our daily journeys à pied.

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Evening: Nightlife. We arrived into the city in the evening and headed directly to dinner in the Upper East Side at Candle 79 for an unbelievable fine-dining experience and vegan, organic plates. Stephanie was especially excited to dine here because loves the chef’s cookbook! Afterwards, our good friend currently living in New York joined up to show us a night out on the town. We were ambitious and traversed half of the city from East Village to Chinatown to Brooklyn.

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Morning: Weekend brunching is part of the NYC lifestyle. We highly recommend a casual brunch at Jack’s Wife Freda in West Village. This charming yet understated American-Mediterranean bistro is super popular with locals and tourists alike. We ordered their Eggs Benny, Madame Freda, and cappuccinos with cute “coffee art” to go with.

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Afternoon: Wander West Village past local outdoor markets, small neighborhood parks, and high end boutiques.  Charming brick winding streets lined with old brick buildings give the area a lovely laid back feel. Seasonal veggies and homemade goodies were displayed in stalls at an outdoor neighborhood market. We also hopped into a few shops to browse their fall/winter collections, including Intermix, Maje, and Sandro (some of Stephanie’s favorites).

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Afternoon: Explore Chelsea Market. This indoor urban space includes a diverse food market and local arts scene. It’s also one of New York’s hot spots for unique antiques, collectibles, and vintage clothing. Chelsea Market was a fun pit stop and great entry point to access the High Line.

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Afternoon: Walk the High Line. The High Line is an elevated freight line turned walkway that runs from Ganesvoort St. up the West Side. The walkway offers pedestrians an urban oasis and a different perspective of the city. Expect crowds in the afternoon, especially on a sunny day, and great people watching. You can hop on/off the High Line at several access points, but we walked the path in its entirety.

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Afternoon: Times Square and shopping. If you didn’t take a picture in Times Square, did you even really go to New York? This tourist packed mecca is one for the books, and while we don’t love most overcrowded tourist attractions, we felt like this was still a NYC bucket list must. The Square is full of New York’s famed hustle and bustle energy, and the massive flashing billboards are also dazzling by night.

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Afternoon: In NYC, you’ll walk. A lot. What was meant to be a rather short cab ride from Times Square back to our place turned into an adventure in itself. As hard as we tried one late afternoon, we couldn’t hail a taxi (they were all full!) and decided to take the city blocks by foot. We walked all the way back from Times Square to the Upper East Side and on the way passed interesting architecture and notable New York landmarks including the New York Public Library, Bryant Park, and designer shops on Park Ave.

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Evening:  Sip a cocktail at an upscale rooftop bar. The Press Lounge came highly acclaimed by local friends. To get there, take the elevator up to the 16th floor at the Ink48 Hotel. You’ll be rewarded by panoramic views of the city and the Hudson River. We sipped on cocktails poolside and caught the sun setting over the city and stayed for a beautiful full moon rise.

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Evening: Dine in Hell’s Kitchen. With a lot of restaurant variety in the area, it can be hard to choose where to stop. We popped into a Thai restaurant called Obao, which had amazing and affordable plates plus a hip club-like ambiance. Take a stroll around Hell’s Kitchen past late night restaurants and bars up to Times Square to experience the neon-lit block by night. On the way out of of the tourist-packed Square, we discovered a reverse happy hour at Bar Catalina (675 9th Ave A) and stayed for bubbly rose and impromptu dancing with the bar staff. Go for great happy hour/reverse happy hour options and a fun cozy vibe!

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Morning: Local coffee spot. Strolled around Upper East Side to Birch Coffee, a local coffee chain, to get our morning dose of caffeine. Not only is Birch Coffee delicious, but the company also purchases coffee beans from sustainable farms around the world with the aim of “making the coffee industry a fair and sustainable one.” Oh, and the pastries! You know we had to try the gourmet Texas-sized donuts. We split a dulce de leche donut and our taste buds got sent to heaven.

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Afternoon: Pop into the Plaza Hotel & stroll Central Park. The Plaza Hotel dominates the square at the lower end of Central Park. Inside the revolving glass doors, you’ll be rewarded with giant chandeliers and the definition of New York luxury. From there, walk into the park past ponds, bridges, and benches. You may also discover some tucke treasures like the Alice in Wonderland statue and the Belvedere Castle. On your way out of the Park, walk down the grand avenues on the West and East peripheries with adorned facades that will definitely inspire major home design envy.

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Evening: On the road again. Hail a taxi or ride sharing service directly from your phone to catch a ride back to airport. While Uber and Lyft are good ride sharing options, many New Yorkers use Gett and Via. Vacation Vagabond tip: First time Gett users will get $20 off their first ride by entering the code GTTEGOT. First time Via users will get $10 off their first ride with referral code stephanie6j7b. Until next time, New York!

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